Can homeschooled children achieve academically? - Nicola


Not that many years ago we would use children for all manner of things we deemed necessary - cleaning chimneys, selling posies, picking the pockets of well to do gentlemen. Then, quite rightly, we realised that this was not a responsible way to treat these innocent souls but we needed somewhere to keep them under control whilst we got on with doing grown up things in a grown up world. Schools were basically child prisons and it made sense that whilst they were all in one space we teach them stuff so that when they were old enough they could clean chimneys and sell posies immediately and make up for all that pesky time they had lost being a kid. I'm sad to say there are schools that are like this still. 



Of course there are many wonderful schools filled with countless dedicated teachers. Exposure to these amazing people is undoubtedly one of the major advantages of sending our precious cargo to these establishments. I also think schools are very helpful in achieving the elusive goal of raising a 'well rounded' individual. It might be challenging for one family to ensure a child gets the measure of twenty or thirty subjects. That being said being an all rounder is all very 90's, specialism is the new black and can you help grow a handful of extra special talents? Absolutely! Venus Williams totally homeschooled; Taylor Swift homeschooled up to the hilt and they are, obviously, very successful. As your question was about academics perhaps these examples aren't helpful but then my question to you is, how important are academics really? 



I'm not saying the ability to read is overrated but I'm a strong believer in that quotation about the dude and the fish. One salmon supper will keep him full for a day but a rod, some waders and a few tips on the best bait and he will eat for life. Our aim as parents should not be to shove academics into our kids brains like education is an all you can eat knowledge buffet but to foster a desire to learn and encourage the confidence to learn independently and if you want to do that at home I have no doubt that you can. 

Martyn the amazing blogger behind 'Inside Martyn's Thoughts' will address all your homeschooling fears over on his blog. Start here with the importance of unschooling!

thumbnailsizeEthan & Evelyn

10 comments

  1. I admire anyone who homeschools - I simply couldn't do it, I don't have the temperament and it would be a nightmare for all involved! #fromtheheart

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  2. Very interesting post. I think that homeschooling can be great for the right parent and the right child. It might also be a disaster. But then, plenty of kids also find mainstream school a disaster, so making an informed decision about what is the best option for your family and your child is probably the way to go. #fromtheheart

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    1. I agree it reminds me of an extension of the being at home vs childcare for younger children. There isn't an official right way.

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  3. I think home schooling is a wonderful thing. At one stage I did considered about homeschooling my boy, but like-wise I don't have the patience and I admired teachers that do the job. I do still try to teach him to speak Thai from time-to-time. It pains me when he says he doesn't understand Thai. But it is so difficult when his whole surrounding is English-spoken. There are many good schools in near where we live. The one we are closest to (about 1 mins walk) is an outstanding school rated by Ofstead but their academia profile is like Sandhurst. My boy and I talked about it and instead we rather cycle across town to go to a school that we think he will enjoys best. He started Reception in September and he throughly enjoys it. Let's hope it stay that way or else home-ed it is. :) Thanks for linking up. x

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    1. It's so cool that your son has access to another language. I'm fascinated by you saying you actively teach him I always just assumed that you would just speak it? I also love that school choice was a joint decision, I think it's really empowering for children to be involved in such things x

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  4. I think we have to consider really what the point of education is which it seems gets forgotten all the time. We get so hung up on academic learning that we can loose the child and their individual talents.
    I don't home school but these are my concerns about mainstream education. My children are at a fabulous school at the moment and I work hard to help them not feel that the test results at school tell are a reflection on themselves as people. Kirsten

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    1. This is fab, I wish my mum had a similar stance! I know that we need some way to represent our achievements but I think there's an over reliance on tests, particularly sit down for an hour, regurgitate information style ones that reflect NO REAL LIFE SITUATION EVER. My brother was one of those people that can sit in a class and vaguely listen and ace a test six months later whereas I'm a rubbish auditory learner and would literally have to write the facts out over and over again to force it into my brain.

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  5. Confession: I'm intending to homeschool my baby boy and any other children that come along. I'm personally not very fond of formal education and think that homeschooling would fit much better into our lifestyle (cannot imagine the stress of getting everyone fed and out of the door by a set time every day!)

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    1. I love that this is a confession! Homeschooling is something that comes up quite regularly with parents where I live (I do live in Brighton though!) Lifestyle is one of the number one reasons for choosing it.

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